IF YOU CONSTANTLY TWEET ON TWITTER ARE YOU A TWIT?

I don’t really get into following Twitter but I couldn’t resist looking at what Piers Morgan posted during the Olympics about Olympians and winning gold.

Here’s a few of his postings at the time for you to consider:

“America has a much better ‘win’ mentality than Britain. We love celebrating losers.”

“Everyone who fails to win Gold is a loser, yes. Not a derogatory comment, just a fact.”

“Ask real winners like Ferguson, Mourinho, Phelps or Bolt if coming 2nd or 3rd means anything.”

Here’s my take on his comments. Most of us like to win, no question about that. My family will tell you that when it comes to family games – ten pin bowling, monopoly, mini golf… I am highly competitive and aim to win. Listening to Mark Todd for example, talk about losing their grasp on a potential gold to fourth, his disappointment was palpable – he and the team really wanted to be the Olympic champions but they weren’t. Yes Mr Morgan, this is a fact but, does that mean however, that we should not still celebrate the fact that the team is ranked 4th in the world in a sport dominated for some time by European countries with resources that far exceed what we as a country can offer? How many of our athletes missed on medals but are ranked in the top 10 in the world? I would argue that we are not losers – far from it. These athletes still inspire, motivate and indirectly encourage others to get out there and give of their best which is probably why they were greeted by so many well-wishers when they arrived home this week. And it was great to hear some of the athletes who did win “unexpected” medals talk about how they hoped they were inspiring others to take up their particular sport.

Perhaps in our classrooms we should adopt Morgan’s approach and apply it in all facets of our lives and tell our students they are losers if they cannot understand a concept, if their test result is only 80% or if they can’t catch or pass a ball with accuracy. Were we to adopt this approach, I would resign tomorrow. As teachers we need to recognise and honour every accomplishment that our students display. Encourage them to aim for gold – absolutely, but destroy their confidence and self-esteem by letting them know that they are losers – yeah, right.

I’ll leave you with this thought – if we didn’t have losers, how could we have winners?

Matahui School, Financially Literate Children

posted in: Class Blogs, Pohutukawa yrs 5,6 | 0

 

Over the last few weeks the children in class have been earning money in their online Banqer accounts.

Today we had a discussion about expenses, that in the real world while we earn money we also have to pay money for different goods and services.  In this discussion we also talked about the difference between paying rent and having a mortgage.

When I told the class that they would have to pay rent on their desks, $5 per week.  One of the students immediately thought that this was not on and that they would like to purchase their desk.  The cost of purchase was set at $1,000 as these desks are very high quality.

 

This same student came back to me later in the day to say that they think they will save up enough so they could buy two desks and then rent one out and at a lower rate than I was.This student displayed innovated and creative thinking.

Next week the student will be given the opportunity to create their own business.  I can’t wait to see what they come up with.

 

Matahui Paper Mill

posted in: Class Blogs, Pohutukawa yrs 5,6 | 0

This week in class we have been investigating the properties of paper; translucent, strong, insulator, non magnetic, flexible, thin, floats…..

Then we learnt the processes involved in making paper from trees.

From this discussion we then started our own Paper Mill.

First we shredded the paper.

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Then we blitzed the paper in the food processor to make a pulp.

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We added a lot of water to this pulp before using our screens to make our first sheets.

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We then taught our buddies how to make paper too.

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I wonder what other materials we could make paper from?

Matahui Room 3 and 6 Buddies Visit the Art Gallery

Room 3 and 6 attended the Otherworld exhibition at the Tauranga Art Gallery last Thursday afternoon. he program gave the students further insight into a number of different forms of art including Sculpture, Digital Landscapes and Landscape painting.

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Hannah discuses the afternoons program under the the yellow installation in the main foyer.

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‘The Last City’ sculptography by Peter Madden

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Making our own sculptography! It was lovely to see the students engaging with in other in the creative process. Mel who hosted the students was very impressed with the degree of sophistication and imagination the students showed in the creation of their sculptures.

Room 1 and 5 enjoy a Teddy Bear’s Picnic

Room One’s inquiry this term is the question ‘What are our stories of the past and how can we tell them?’  We connected to the past by way of our teddy bears.  We invited our buddies from Room 5 to join us and we each brought along a special old teddy or soft toy. We enjoyed listening to their stories, followed by a delicious food at our teddy bear’s picnic!  Our buddies even made the bread rolls themselves!

P1110759Ellie is a snuggly elephant.  He is my toy.  It used to be my Dads when he was a boy.  The first thing he did was sit on him!  He looks like an elephant but he is yellow.  I like to hug him.  Ellie is cool.  By Sam

P1110758My Santa teddy is cuddly.  My Great Nana made Santa for me before she died.  Santa is snuggly.  I think he really likes me because I look after him.  By Blair

P1110755Miranda is my doll.  Miranda has long orange hair.  I got her on my first birthday from a Katikati shop.  I pushed my trolley around Katikati with her in it.  I was cute pushing her around Katikati.  She loves me!!  Miranda!!  She comes to some tea parties and sleeps in my bed.  She is knitted.  She’s a school girl.  I love Miranda!  By Aby

P1110757Toby is my teddy.  But Georgia had him when she was a baby.  Toby is a kind and cuddly teddy.  I love to hug my teddy.  By Gabe

P1110756Goody Goody Gumdrops is my favourite bear.  I like to cuddle him.  He looks cute in his T shirt.  By Saxon.

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My dog is named Troy.  Troy is a teddy.  He is a fast teddy.  I got him from my Mum.  My Mum got him from her friend and his sister.  He has got brown lines going to his eyes.  I like to pat his back.  Troy is cute.  By Nikora.

 

Can you match our water colour paintings with the photos?

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DOES GOOD NEWS EXIST? YOU BET!

When our children were small we gave up watching the news on television the day our daughter asked …”Why are there always bad things happening in the world?” She is now 32 and guess what, when we watch the news it seems that nothing has changed. Most of the stories presented reflect a high degree of political and social unrest in many parts of the world. Moreover, the level of violence against humankind seems to have escalated. Add to this the bad press surrounding the Olympics, be it the potential impact of the Zika virus, the doping scandal that has rocked Russia, or the security of athletes in Brazil, and you wonder where the good news exists. Well let me tell you……

Watching and listening to Ella and Bryden Nicholas speak from the heart about their kayaking one cannot help but recognise the motivation, drive and positive energy these two young athletes exude. Furthermore, when they speak about their cultural heritage and the pride they have in representing their country they illustrate what the Olympics ethos aims to achieve. They are excited about being a part of a world event that draws in countries across the globe. As a school we share in their excitement and revel in the fact that they epitomise what we want for our students when they finally leave Matahui School. There is not just good news, but GREAT news……..thanks Ella and Bryden for being such shining lights.

MOTIVATION, DRIVE, COMMITMENT = OLYMPIANS

Whilst the Olympic Games this year may well have been tarnished with so many athletes being banned, Matahui School has reason to celebrate. This week Mennie Scapens forwarded me a short film clip featuring Ella, Bryden and Jane Nicholas. Both Ella and Bryden are off to Rio to both represent the Cook Islands in the canoe slalom at the Olympics. What is even more outstanding is the fact that this will be Ella’s second Olympic Games.  Watching the interview with Ella it was not difficult to imagine the pride her family must feel in the accomplishments of their children. Check out the link on our Facebook page.

And let’s not forget Dylan Schmidt who attended Matahui for a time. Even back then he was showing incredible skill and commitment in trampolining and now he is off to represent New Zealand as the country’s first ever trampoline gymnast.

Our sincerest congratulations and best wishes go with these amazing young people who continue to excel and demonstrate what can be achieved with motivation, drive, enthusiasm and commitment – what wonderful role models. You can be assured that our entire community will be glued to the broadcasts of the Olympics, especially when you are featured. Exciting times ahead!

Kia kaha.

STUDENT VOICE…WHY WE NEED TO LISTEN

STUDENT VOICE…
It is important that within the context of school that students know that they have a voice. To know that they will be heard and people will listen. It is also important that they realise that in having a voice there are protocols which need to be adhered to in order for their voice to resonate.

There are times when a conflict may arise in the playground that requires adult intervention, or a student finds something they feel compromises student safety. I have students come to my office to share their ideas, opinions and perspectives on a range of topics that are important to them and this goes way beyond asking me to help resolve a problem. They are aware that there are effective ways to communicate starting with being polite, respectful, and sensible – basic protocols.

There are instances where they come to share initiatives that require a decision from me and at these times I am reminded of a comment made by Monte Selby, an American educator and musician I heard speak at a conference……”When kids come to your door with a proposal, an idea, or an event that they want to organise don’t just say no. Ask them ……”What do you need to do to make me say yes?” Wise words when giving students a voice that can ultimately translate into positive action.

At the moment I have two groups considering what they need to do to make me say yes. One group is keen to play rugby with slightly more physical contact and the other group are aiming to reinvigorate the Matahui Pet Day. In both instances I believe they know that they have been heard, that I have listened and am prepared to support them in making their ideas a reality.  But, they are also aware that they need to demonstrate considerable responsibility to ensure their voice translates into action, by finding out what they need to do to make me say yes.

So next time your children come to you with a proposal, an idea or event they want to organise or see happen, ask them ….”What do you need to do to make me say yes?”